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Vol. 4
July Issue
Year 2003
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Articles


in Vol. 4 - July Issue - Year 2003
Computer Simulation for a Peen Forming Application



Author: Peter Sonderegger, Project Engenieer at Baiker AG
















Since computer simulations have become more and more cost effective, they are nowadays an often used tool to demonstrate the feasibility of a new application. For Baiker AG, a Swiss manufacturer of peening and blasting equipment, it has not been the first time that this technology has been integrated into a project.

In conjunction with MOTOMAN, a German manufacturer of robots, whole video sequences of the nozzle movements can been realized.

The benefits of such a simulation are obvious. On the one hand it helps tremendously to explain the concept of a machinery layout to the potential customer. On the other hand, even more important, the designing for the engineers becomes much easier. The engineers do not have to "imagine" the possible movements of a robot along the work-piece surface, but can actually see it on screen. That takes a lot of risks out of a project, especially if done the first time.
And last but not least, for many projects, specialists from different engineering fields are involved. Not all of those specialists necessarily can read technical drawings, but certainly all of them easily understand a video sequence. That makes the needed communication simple and effective.

Baiker AG uses such simulations for one of the largest peen forming machine projects they have ever been involved. The machine will peen form fuselage parts of an European aircraft manufacturer. It’s going to be a completely automated application, in which no manual peen forming is involved.

Already the dimensions of this peen-forming machine are impressive. Since it is a closed system, the cabin will be 12 meters long and 4.5 meters wide. The air pressure peen forming application uses 2 nozzles at a time and a shot size of 4 millimeters.

It is a joint project carried out by two companies. While Baiker AG is going to deliver all the machinery parts, KSA in Aachen is responsible for the software and the development of the various programs.




Author: Peter Sonderegger
For Information:
Baiker AG, Alpenstrasse 1
8152 Glattbrugg, Switzerland
Tel. +41.43.2116272, Fax:+41.43.2116271
E-mail: info@baiker.ch
www.baiker.ch